Stubborn Toilet Bowl Rings

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated February 23, 2015)

4

Do you happen to have a toilet bowl ring that simply won't go away when using normal methods? Stubborn toilet bowl rings can often be fairly annoying little messes to have to deal with. Luckily, there are a few methods that you can use that will get rid of theme, and allow you to have a beautifully sparkling toilet once again. However, some caution should be exercised when using some of these methods since they can be fairly harsh. Considering how delicate porcelain can often be, you don't want to be too aggressive without knowing what you are facing.

  • Water softeners. Often times stubborn toilet bowl rings are directly the result of hard water deposits. While you can always take some time to clean the ring after it appears, it is usually better to stop the problem from ever forming in the first place. If you can afford to do it, install a water softener in your home and have it maintained properly. This should reduce a large number of water related problems not just in the bathroom, but throughout the rest of the house as well.
  • Pumice stones. One of the better ways to remove stubborn toilet bowl rings is by using a pumice stone. These coarse stones will help "grind" away the stains. However, you will want to make sure that the pumice stone is wet in order to avoid scratching the porcelain.
  • Coke. Believe it or not, but you can use Coca-Cola as a cleaning agent in the bathroom. Pour a two liter bottle of the soda into the toilet bowl. Let is sit for a little while, and then use a soft rag, or scrubbie to begin cleaning the ring away. Usually all you will need to do is let the Coke sit in the toilet bowl for about 15 minutes and then begin wiping away.
  • Muriatic acid. A rather dramatic method for cleaning stubborn toilet bowl rings is to use a little bit of muriatic acid. This type of acid is easily obtained at any home improvement store, and sometimes at your local department store. Be sure that you follow the directions on the back of the package closely, and that you use the weakest form of the acid possible. In addition, you will want to make sure that the toilet bowl is empty, and the water supply turned off, as well as you are wearing protective gear while working with this material. The muriatic acid will actually eat away the first layer or two of the surface in your toilet bowl, and thus get rid of the stain.
  • Chemical cleaners. Less dramatic than the muriatic acid, but still fairly effective, is to use some chemical cleaners. Such things as CLR (Calcium, Lime and Rust Remover), Comet, ZAP, Domestos, and others. Before using any of them, make sure that you are familiar with the directions from the manufacturer to ensure that you are using the cleaner in the proper manner. Always start with the weakest amount of the material that you can, and then work your way up to stronger amounts only if necessary.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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What is six minus 6?

2015-09-03 19:27:12

Theresa

So far, a pumice stone is the only thing that has worked for me. My water is only a little bit hard, yet Lime-Away and CLR don't work. I'm going to try the sandpaper idea. I like that I can use a piece and throw it away. I don't like keeping the pumice stone between uses.


2015-02-24 01:35:11

Colleen

Thanks Joe! Gosh I never thought of that. Wonder if my little Dremel tool will facilitate to make it go quicker? Hmm. Am going to try it!
JJ I usually buy my sandpaper at any Wal-Mart or Home Depot, but I have seen also at Dollar General and 99cent stores too.


2015-02-23 13:05:18

JJ

I must live in a an area with terribly hard water; CLR does nothing. I've tried Lime-Away too. I do use pumice bar, but it's harsh. I think I'll stay from muriatic acid, being that I live in an apartment. Where can I get the sandpaper you mentioned, Joe?


2015-02-23 10:42:48

Joe

In stead of pumice stone (very harsh) I've used 600 grit wet / dry abrasive paper. Just get it wet and lightly sand, poof - ring disappears.


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